Reaching People with our Writing

We all have a common goal

Gilbert Corliss

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Photo by Author

What You Need

To have a viral blog, I need a headline that sounds interesting and somehow promises to offer something of value to the reader. According to Tim Denning, anyway, that will, potentially, help a blog to go viral. Yet, ProBlogger promotes a slightly different message. (11 Tips to Create a Personal Connection with Your Audience (problogger.com)) Write what you want. Tell a story. You can write anything in a blog and find an audience.

Sources

I want to do the latter, but I want a following and I want an income from my writing. Some proponents of blogs require you to write in a niche, or no more than five niches (Tom Kreuger, for one) while others scoff at that concept (Tim Denning). Both these writers have hundreds of thousands of followers, and each makes a seven-figure income or more. So, each has found the methodology that has been successful for him, as have many others who have followed their advice, or taken their courses.

(I strongly recommend Tim, Tom, and ProBlogger for education in these areas). I want to use some of their techniques, but I want to write my story. I enjoy writing from the heart, and I love to write my story in the hope that my witness can inspire or teach others from my life successes and failures, my gains and losses, or even just my philosophies gleaned from the events of my life.

I hope the theme of my stories can lead to a take-away that can be beneficial to my readers. I know, just putting these thoughts to paper is beneficial to me.

No One Cares

Tim Denning wanted it made clear that no one cares about you. And he is not the first one I have heard this from. And I know he are right. What they care about is themselves, what happens to them, or how they can improve or grow with the information they find in your article.

With that in mind, turning the story from “I” to “You” makes the story one to which a reader can relate. My method is an attempt to make the “you” resound in the story of “I,” or how you can gain valuable insights in your own situation from one I have already lived.

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Gilbert Corliss

Novelist, self-studied in many sciences, theology, music, and art.